<a href="https://biblicalmissiology.org/author/jmorton/" target="_self">Jeff Morton</a>

Jeff Morton

Jeff Morton / Bunyan Towery (M.Div. and D.Miss., Biola) is pastor of discipleship, Hillside Baptist Church, Dickinson, ND. He is author of " Two Messiahs," "Insider Movements: Biblically Incredible or Incredibly Brilliant?" and co-editor of "Chrislam: How Missionaries are Promoting an Islamized Gospel."

8 Comments

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    Hello Jeff,

    I’ve read the book and loved it. It was very encouraging to me because of what God is doing. I appreciate your review of the book. However, I’m not exactly understanding the frequent referencing to IM type stuff. I, also, am most certainly not with IM practices in any way. Just recently, I used a critique of an IM article in Christianity Today that was referenced by Steve Addison. That said…I think the IM referencing about numbers might be out of place, however, accuracy is something paramount to me.

    After reading the book, I then looked all over the CityTeam site for their materials. I found the dissertation that Dave Hunt wrote about the project and in it you find all the names and places, I believe, together with some more details on how their practices played out. I’ve also watched some videos by David Watson, who’s training and methodology Dave Hunt used while in East Africa. That said, they seem to be pretty solid on their numbers and integrity as far as I can tell. Also, I believe this same methodology has contributed greatly to the movement among the Bhoujpuri in India, so there is some pretty good road-testing. Plus, it’s bearing fruit in several other countries as well, including the USA.

    Personally, as a newer discipler, I’m striving to implement these strategies among the Muslims I’m around. They seem to fit well, especially given the extremely warped world view that Muslims grow up with.

    @Georges, Let me say that we super enjoyed your stay with us recently and we were blessed, as always. We are STILL excited for the fruit you are seeing. Perhaps you have seen (in the IM community?) lots of examples of people reporting unsubstantiated numbers. Does that lead to an early conclusion of ‘Missionary Fiction’? Just wondering. From what I saw in the book, it looks like there’s plenty of persecution accompanying the spread of the gospel in these countries. So, it doesn’t seem like they are hidden. However, I do think it’s wise (in my limited opinion) to not broadcast to the broader world details of a movement until it’s got significantly more numbers and time in maturity. This movement is under the radar, just like how Jesus comes into a person’s heart rather quietly from the outside. No need to bring any government reprisal or provide opportunity for other workers to bring in strategies that are movement killers. I’m sure there will be a great time (perhaps soon?) when this can come out in the open. Perhaps the locals should/will decide that?

    Anyway, all that to say that there is some other info out there on this great move of God.

    I love getting info from you guys and I love your desire to keep things Biblical….so do I. Please keep up the great work and may we expect amazing things to come from the amazing God we love and worship!

    Blessings!

  2. Avatar

    I’m always amazed by how many people post on this site with fake names, and who are really the most negative writers and commenters of all.

    1 John 1:7, “But if we walk in the light, as he is in the light, we have fellowship with one another, and the blood of Jesus, his Son, purifies us from all sin.”

    People who use fake names to hide who they are really are trying to keep themselves and their deeds in the dark. They certainly don’t want fellowship.

    Where is the fruit? We may disagree, that is one thing, but Christians are of the light. Shameful things are done in secret and the dark.

  3. Jeff Morton

    Beza:

    Greetings.

    Too bad you aren’t returning to read this. I tried your email address two times, but both times my reply was unsuccessful.**

    I’m disheartened that you read my critique of Jerry’s book as unbridled cynicism. That was neither my intent nor the result.

    Perhaps you simply found what you expected to find?

    That Jerry read the critique pre-publication–and thanked me–is that cynicism on my part?

    That I was prepared to not like the book, but did (second paragraph)–is that cynicism?

    That the only footnotes to the review were Jerry’s comments, complete and unedited–does a cynic hoping to make a point do that?

    That I “cautioned” myself when I wrote, “I understand it appears I am being persnickety by pointing out these minor problems. I’m willing to be considered a curmudgeon about all this . . .”–does a cynic allow such self-condemnation like this? Does a cynical review only mention “minor problems” when they could be called major catastrophes (which they weren’t, of course)?

    That I ended my review on a positive note, that it contains great stories, the DBS is “a commendable way to disciple unbelievers into believers,” and some good biblical principles–is that cynicism?

    In the end, how you react to what I’ve written is your choice. I am not attempting to persuade you to stay with the site or leave. But I do object to being wrongly thought of as cynical. A curmudgeon, certainly; a cynic, certainly not.

    My original intent was to not reply to your comment on the site, but to keep it private. Your false email account did not allow me to do that.

    Blessings,

    Jeff Morton

    **This is why my text was rejected when I replied to your email address:
    SMTP error from remote server after transfer of mail text:
    host mta6.am0.yahoodns.net[98.136.216.25]:
    554 delivery error: dd This user doesn’t have a yahoo.com account (bezabeza11224576@yahoo.com) [0] – mta1116.mail.gq1.yahoo.com

  4. Avatar

    I used to read this site from time to time, but was turned off by the overwhelmingly negative tone. I just checked back today to find this latest example of cynicism disguised as missiological criticism. I’m at least glad to see that your conversations have become virtually an in-house discussion between your little group. This will be THE LAST time I ever look on this site, unless I need a dose of cynical, critical, (truly) narrow-minded nonsense.

  5. Jeff Morton

    ERROR = I meant to say, “I do think we should suspend disbelief and belief . . .”

  6. Jeff Morton

    Salaam and Georges: the jury is still out on the statistics Trousdale provides. They are hard to believe, but I don’t think we should suspend all disbelief and belief until an independent audit is finished. I know that the IM has put us all at DEFCON 5 when it comes to statistics, but the solution is hardly to go ballistic (neither of you has done that; I’m just saying . . .).

  7. Avatar

    Jeff: I wonder if you have any thoughts about the book’s title?
    a. Does the fact that there is a so-called movement necessarily make it miraculous?
    b. “Hundred’s of Thousands” implies at least 200,000. Where are they, as Georges asked?
    c. “falling in love with Jesus”. Has a good touchy-feely sense to it, but it is something of substance? Do these people know what sin is? Do they know who a Holy God is? Do they know what repentance is? If so, they would know what conversion is. Are they “falling in love” with the person who will give them fire insurance, or are they truly bowing the knee to the King of Kings and Lord of Lords? Seems like if it is the later the title might read, “are bowing the knee to King Jesus.” If they would show exclusive allegiance to this King Jesus, the shock ways would reverberate through the air. Case in point, the apostles were those who “turned the world upside down”

    Lastly, I am not sure I missed something, but this Jesus only, Gospels only, seems to miss Acts and the Epistles.

    Thanks again and I hope to hear from you or Jerry.
    Shalom

  8. Avatar

    Jeff, Your review is amazing. I could not have done anything this good and this detailed.
    Thank you for the many challenges.
    I know Jerry and have talked to him personally. I honestly was confused by the claims and when I read the book it sounded to me like Missionary Fiction. But hey, if God is doing such great things, let us rejoice. But I think that if there are so many Christians, in the hundreds of thousands, what is the reason for fear of exposing them. Are they all hidden? If it is true that there are all these conversions, they should be visible and known. So there is no reason to hide them.

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